Wild Boar Fell Yorkshire Dales

Posted in Wild Boar Fell on June 28th, 2011 by David Murphy

On the 4th June 2011 me and Paul left to do a Wildcamp on Wild Boar Fell in the Yorkshire Dales, I left my car at Pauls at 3pm to jump into his and we arrived approximately 5.30pm. We both agreed the weather wasnt about to change in the time we were here low cloud and fog covered the summit we hoped on a break in the fog which didnt come apart from brief glimpses of the ground below us.

 

After pitching our tents near the end of Wild Boar fell named The Nab we talked till about 12.30am in a wind chill of around -2 degrees whilst gulping down our booze which Paul always Insists on me bringing, this time it was white rum and coke. Morning came we were up early as Paul needed to be back home I lay awake all night as usual whilst he slept like a baby and boy did he rub it in. No sign of any sunrise as per usual we packed up our damp tents and off we went, a good time was had, plenty of laughs even though the weather was crap.

 

Me and Paul on Wild Bore Fell camped near the nab.

My Akto and Pauls Terra Nova Voyager Superlite

Tuna Steak and Sweetcorn yum.

Just reached the Summit of Wild Boar Fell

Wild Boar Fell Summit

Me and Paul at trig point

Wild Boar Fell Summit

Another Wild Boar Trig Point Shot

Wild Boar Fell Summit Trig Point

Knocking Back The Booze

Drink on Wild Boar Fell Summit

 

Above the Start Point on the left and right our Wildcamp Location

Wild Boar Fell
Wildboar pic.jpg
The summit trig point
Elevation 708 m (2,323 ft)
Prominence 344 m (1,129 ft)
Parent peak Cross Fell
Listing Marilyn, Hewitt, Nuttall
Location
Location North Yorkshire/Cumbria, England
Range Pennines
OS grid SD757988
Topo map OS Landranger 98

Wild Boar Fell is a mountain (or more accurately a fell) in Mallerstang on the eastern edge of Cumbria, England. At 708 metres (2,323 ft), it is either the 4th highest fell in the Yorkshire Dales or the 5th, whether counting nearby High Seat (709 m) or not. (In fact neither of these are, at present, in the Yorkshire Dales National Park, although there are plans to extend its boundaries in the near future to include Mallerstang). The nearest high point is Swarth Fell which is a mile-long (1.5 km) ridge to the south, at grid reference SD754965. To the east, on the opposite side of the narrow dale, are High Seat and Hugh Seat.

History

The fell gets its name from the wild boar which inhabited the area over 500 years ago.[1] But it is unusual, for this area of Viking settlement, that its old Norse name seems to have disappeared, whereas the names of many of its features, such as The Nab, Dolphinsty, etc., retain their Norse origin.

In earlier times, probably up to the mid nineteenth century, the Millstone Grit, or gritstone, which forms the flat top of the fell, was used for making millstones. Some partly formed millstones can be seen on the eastern flank of the fell - and also on the corresponding western flank of Mallerstang Edge on the opposite side of the dale. Sand (composed of Millstone Grit) from the beach of Sand Tarn was used by local people to sharpen knives and scythes; they made "strickles" by sticking the sand to wooden blocks with tar.

A tusk, claimed to be of "the last wild boar caught on the fell", is kept in Kirkby Stephen parish church.

During World War II Wild Boar Fell was sometimes used for training tank crews from the army base at Warcop in the handling of tanks in difficult terrain.

Geography

Wild Boar Fell is a dramatic sight and a landmark for many miles around. Approached from the north it gives the misleading impression that it is a peak (see photo, above left). But from the south of the dale at Aisgill its true profile is seen, not dissimilar to Ingleborough, with steep sides and a flat top (consisting of a cap of millstone grit).

The classic route for walking up Wild Boar is via the bridle way from Hazelgill Farm, ascending west to High Dophinsty before following Scriddles ridge top to Blackbed Scar. Once there you are on Wild Boar Fell's table top plateau, a rather boggy expanse. The summit is marked by a trig point and Sand Tarn is about 300 m (1,000 ft) to the west, just below the summit.

The views from the top make a spectacular panorama. The Howgills, Pennines, the Lake district fells, the Yorkshire Three Peaks can all be seen and, on a clear day, there is even a glimpse of the sea at Morecambe Bay.

A common feature of many Pennine dales and Lake District fells are the groups of cairns on the high ground. There is a fine cluster of "stone men" on The Nab of Wild Boar Fell - and a smaller group on subsidiary peak, Little Fell (559 m, 1834 ft) at grid reference NY766008, 2 km to the north. There seems little agreement on when, why, or by which people such cairns were built. (One common suggestion, that they were built by shepherds as markers for paths, may explain some of the cruder "piles of stones"; but groups like those on The Nab surely need a more convincing explanation).

Wild Boar Fell, seen from Mallerstang in June, with wild flowers in the hay meadows  
The table top profile of Wild Boar Fell, from Aisgill  
The Nab, Wild Boar Fell  
Cairns on The Nab, Wild Boar Fell  
A panoramic shot along the eastern escarpment; Ann Bowker

References

  1. ^ A. Wainwright, Wainwright in the Limestone Dales, Guild Publishing, 1991 (page 12-16)

External links

Media related to Wild Boar Fell at Wikimedia Commons

Coordinates: 54°23′03″N 2°22′27″W / 54.38411°N 2.37412°W / 54.38411; -2.37412

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WildCamping On Ingleborough Yorkshire Dales

Posted in Ingleborough on March 30th, 2011 by David Murphy

On the 30th August 2010 I set off alone to climb Ingleborough in the Yorkshire Dales

 

 

 

 

 and found a lovely spot about 8ft off the summit so I pitched my tent on this little shelf.

 

 

 

shelter from the wind in one direction and a marvellous view over to the other directions, apart from forgetting my cup for my tea and havent to use a collapsible nalgene bottle, on getting on settled i proceeded to get out my cooking pots and starting cooking my tea.

 

A view from the summit 

 

A rare occasion to lap up a sunset 

 

 this has to be one of my best experiences wildcamping I have had, watch my video and make your own mind up. 

 

Part One Wildcamping on Ingleborough

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Part Two Wildcamping on Ingleborough

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Ingleborough
Ingleborough from Tatham Fells.jpg
Ingleborough, as seen from Tatham Fells
Elevation 723 m (2,372 ft)
Prominence c. 427 m
Parent peak Cross Fell
Location
Ingleborough is located in Yorkshire Dales
Ingleborough
Yorkshire Dales, England
OS grid SD740745
Coordinates 54°09′57.32″N 2°23′51.02″W / 54.1659222°N 2.3975056°W / 54.1659222; -2.3975056Coordinates: 54°09′57.32″N 2°23′51.02″W / 54.1659222°N 2.3975056°W / 54.1659222; -2.3975056
Topo map OS Landranger 98

Ingleborough is the second highest mountain in the Yorkshire Dales. It is one of the Yorkshire Three Peaks, the other two being Whernside (736) and Pen-y-ghent(694). Ingleborough is frequently climbed as part of the Yorkshire Three Peaks Challenge, which is a 24-mile (38-km) circular challenge walk starting and finishing in Horton in Ribblesdale. If done anti-clockwise Ingleborough is the last mountain climbed, and ascent is from Chapel-le-Dale.

Name

The second part of the name Ingleborough is derived from the Old English word burh, meaning "a fortified place"; in this case, a hill fort. On the top of Ingleborough the remains of an old walled enclosure have been discovered inside which foundations of Iron Age huts have been found.

Geography

Ingleborough is situated in the south-western corner of the Yorkshire Dales, being at the highest point of a large triangle of land with corners at Ingleton, Ribblehead and Settle. The hill is connected to its nearest higher neighbour, Whernside, by a low col or mountain pass at Ribblehead at approximately 296m.

Ingleborough throws out a ridge to the north-east which develops into a summit, Simon Fell, and another summit further down, Park Fell. An ill-defined ridge going south-east from the summit breaks into two large areas of limestone plateau at about 1,300 feet (400 m); both plateaux contain summits and these are the subsidiary summits of Norber and Moughton. On the slopes of the former are the famed Norber Boulders. Continuing south-east the high land is broken by a divide which carries the minor road from Austwick to Helwith Bridge. On the other side of the divide rises the low summit of Smearsett Scar along with its subsidiaries, Pot Scar and Giggleswick Scar; from here the land falls away to the River Ribble at Settle.

On the western side of Ingleborough is a large limestone plateau appropriately known as White Scars, below which runs the 6.5 kilometres (4.0 mi)[1]White Scar Caves, the entrance series of which has been developed as a show cave. The plateau is bounded by Raven Scar, the longest unbroken cliff in the district, and on top of it is the pothole of Meregill Hole. On the southern side (to the west of the Clapham path) is a similar plateau, this one containing potholes such as Fluted Hole and Pillar Hole.

The unassuming but cavernous Juniper Gulf.

The plateau to the north of Norber, an area known as The Allotment, is particularly rich in potholes; one of these, Long Kin East, can be followed by all and sundry for a distance of 100 yards (91 m). Also located here is Juniper Gulf, which descends 420 feet (130 m) underground through an arduous rift, dominated by a small geological fault.

The Smearsett Scar region is not devoid of interesting features either; here can be found the Celtic Wall, the Ebbing and Flowing Well (which has now stopped ebbing and flowing) and a glacial hollow known as the Happy Valley.

Ascents

There are several popular hillwalking routes to its summit. The most frequently-used starting point is probably the village of Ingleton, which lies about 4 miles (6 km) to the southwest. An ascent from here is about 7.5 miles (12.1 km) there and back. The route follows a walled lane, Fell Lane, before emerging onto a flat area, Crina Bottom, scattered with potholes including the considerable Quaking Pot. A steep climb through the limestone cliffs leads to the summit.

The hill may also be climbed from Horton in Ribblesdale six miles (10 km) to the east, following a route crossing extensive areas of limestone pavement in the region of Sulber Nick. This is the route of descent of the Three Peaks Walk and has been heavily improved by the National Trust after going in just thirty years from no path at all to a serious example of footpath erosion. Another route on this flank is from the isolated farmstead of Crummack.

There is also a route from Clapham that follows the Ingleborough Estate nature trail, before passing the Craven Fault, the showcave of Ingleborough Cave, the ravine of Trow Gill and the pothole of Gaping Gill. It then crosses a marshy area and climbs up to the shoulder of Little Ingleborough before following the ridge to the summit. The return to Clapham can be varied by taking the Horton-in-Ribblesdale path for two miles (3 km) before striking south through more limestone pavement to the small top of Norber; a descent past the famed Norber erratics ( Norber Boulders ) finishes a walk of eleven and half miles that Wainwright considered to be the finest walk in the Yorkshire Dales.

There is a northern route from the Hill Inn at Chapel-le-Dale, the route of ascent used by the Three Peaks Walk and the shortest way up the mountain, being just 3 miles (4.8 km) from village to summit. An interesting walk across a limestone plateau with many caves, including Great Douk Cave and Meregill Hole, is followed by a steep and tedious climb to the shoulder of the subsidiary summit of Simon Fell at 2,000 feet (610 m), a mile to the north-east of the summit. The passage from here to the summit is high-level and exhilarating, but requires some scrambling.

Finally there are unwaymarked routes heading NE across Simon Fell and Souther Scales Fell both of which reach a steep descent just beyond the triangulation pillar on Park Fell to reach the Right of Way at New Close. Both routes give commanding views of the area.

The summit

The trig point and windshelter.

The summit is a broad plateau half a mile in circumference carpeted with dry turf. There is an Ordnance Survey trig point (number S. 5619) at the highest point, near the south-western corner. Just to the north is a well-built windshelter with a view indicator or toposcope built into its centre. Between them is a large cairn. At the point where the Ingleton path reaches the summit rim is an even larger cairn; this, remarkably, is the remains of a battlemented round tower (a hospice), built in 1830. The celebrations on the day of its opening ceremony became so alcoholic, however, that parts of it were thrown down there and then, the rest being destroyed later. Along the northern and eastern edges is the shattered wall of a military camp, believed to be Roman. For the view, which is far-reaching and superb, see here. The hill fort which covers 15 acres (61,000 m2) and which the defensive wall can still be seen although much robbed for stone, contains the remains of several stone circles. It is now thought that this was in fact Celtic, the Brigantes tribe the largest tribe in Iron Age Britain a collection of smaller units amalgamated into one tribe. The fort was known to the Romans as the Kings fort. It may be that this was a base for Venutius after his 'divorce' from Cartimandua the Brigantes Queen who was a supporter of the Roman invaders, unlike Venutius who led several rebellions. What we do know is that this fort was used all year, which was unusual for such a location, but at the time of the Romans the climate was much milder, the Romans for example cultivated grapes in Newcastle.

Geology

The striking appearance of Ingleborough from all directions and from a great distance is due to the unusual geology of the underlying rock. The base of the mountain is composed of ancient Silurian and Ordovician rocks and it is on these that the village of Ingleton stands. A belt of Carboniferous Limestone, the 'Great Scar Limestone', some 600 feet (180 m) thick, lies on top of this. Due to the limestone's permeability, all the streams flowing down from the mountain are engulfed upon reaching it, falling into a number of potholes. Above lies the layered Yoredale Series of sedimentary rocks, predominantly shale and sandstone, and generally concealed by the peat but revealed in the escarpments about 1,700 feet (520 m) up. There are also layers of harder limestone sandwiched between the softer rocks which have been eroded faster, and which protect the layers beneath them, leading to the 'tiered' effect. The whole mountain, however, is protected from erosion by a cap of Millstone Grit, known as the Yoredale Series, approximately 100 feet (30 m) tall. The rock above the Millstone Grit layer has been eroded away, which explains the flatness of the summit. A good explanation of the geology and scenery of the area is given in Waltham.[2]

The view

Important mountain peaks visible from Ingleborough are listed here, clockwise from north, with their distance in miles and bearing in degrees. The furthest peak visible is Manod Mawr in Snowdonia, North Wales 103 miles (166 km) away on a bearing of 218 degrees.

North

East

South

West

Gallery

References

  1. ^ Brook, A; D. Brook; J. Griffith; M.H. Long (1991). Northern Caves Volume 2 The Three Peaks. Clapham, via Lancaster: Dalesman Publishing Company Ltd.. pp. 232–234. ISBN 1-85568-033-5.
  2. ^ Waltham, Tony (2007). The Yorkshire Dales: Landscape and Geology. Malmesbury, Wiltshire: Crowood Press. ISBN 978-1-86126-972-0.

External links

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Wildcamping on Whernside Yorkshire Dales

Posted in Whernside on March 30th, 2011 by David Murphy

 22 Oct 2010 me and my mate Paul set off for a Wildcamp on the summit of  Whernside in the Yorkshire Dales soon into our trip the weather made a turn for the worst on reaching the summit the weather was so poor we missed the Summit Trig Point which is as you no are usually a built up monument of stone, we thought after the fairly tiring climb they could have at least put something there for us. On reaching the summit we ran into darkness a long with the ever worsening weather, my satmap was telling me to head towards a very inviting lake/tarn where which we couldn’t actually see, we eventually pitched our tents near the lake after tramping through very wet bogs to get to it.

After probs the worse night I have experienced to date really bad winds and rain lashing the tent we awoke to not that very good of a view we decided to head off back to the path after packing up the tents we walked in a circle trying to find our way back on to the main path above us we walked a hundred yards or so and discovered the trig point that we had just walked past and couldn’t understand how we had missed it.

 

Watch My Vid Below

Whernside
Whernside and Ribblehead Viaduct.jpg
A snow covered Whernside and Ribblehead Viaduct seen from Ribblehead.
Elevation 736 m (2,415 ft)
Prominence 408 m (1,339 ft)
Parent peak Cross Fell
Listing Marilyn, Hewitt, County Top, Nuttall
Location
Whernside is located in Yorkshire Dales
Whernside
Yorkshire Dales, England
OS grid SD738814
Coordinates 54°13′40″N 2°24′12″W / 54.22764°N 2.40338°W / 54.22764; -2.40338Coordinates: 54°13′40″N 2°24′12″W / 54.22764°N 2.40338°W / 54.22764; -2.40338
Topo map OS Landranger 98

Whernside is a mountain in the Yorkshire Dales and is one of the Yorkshire Three Peaks, the other two being Ingleborough and Pen-y-ghent. It is the highest point in the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire,[note 1] with the summit lying on the county border with Cumbria.

In shape Whernside forms a long ridge, running roughly north–south.

Routes

There is a Right of Way footpath running from the east at Ribblehead that heads north via Smithy Hill, Grain Ings before turning west to Knoutberry Haw and then south to Whernside itself. From the summit the ROW heads initially south then steeply southwest down a stepped path to the small village of Bruntscar. If climbed as part of the Yorkshire Three Peaks Challenge (which is normally done anti-clockwise) Whernside will be climbed following the route from up Ribblehead to descend to Bruntscar.

There are however other routes up/down the mountain which are not Rights of Way.

A path heads directly west from the triangulation pillar to reach the road that is Deepdale Lane near White Shaw Moss.

An alternative route heads directly north across Knoutberry Haw to pass Whernside Tarns and reaches the Craven Way at Boot of the Wold.

Following the southern descent for 0.76 miles (1.22 km), instead of turning steeply southeast towards Bruntscar a path continues south running adjacent the wall passing Combe Scar and West Fell to reach the limestone pavements at Ewe's Top.

Finally, 275 yards (251 m) south of the triangulation pillar an old route (partly fenced off) descends (initially very steeply) for 1.3 miles (2 km) to reach a road 275 yards (251 m) southwest of Winterscales Farm, this is the old route of the Three Peaks Challenge. Walkers should select this route with care as it is no longer maintained, boggy, badly eroded and requires extreme care over the final steep ascent/descent. The current route of the Three Peaks fell race runs approximately 440 yards (400 m) north of this old ascent along open moor.

All paths are on Access Land and make an interesting change from the Right of Way ascents/descents.

A walk solely around Whernside starting at the road of The Station Inn, to the top of Whernside and back round through the farm gives a distance of roughly 8 and a half miles.

General

On a clear day the views from the summit to the west can be spectacular, with views of the Lake District and Morecambe Bay, including (with the aid of binoculars) Blackpool Tower, some 40 miles (64 km) away.

Whernside lies about 2 miles (3 km) northwest of Ribblehead Viaduct on the Settle–Carlisle Railway.

Whernside is sometimes confused with the lower peaks of Great Whernside 17 miles (27 km) away and Little Whernside, which are both to the east of Whernside. The word "Whern" is believed to refer to querns (millstones) whilst "side" is derived from the Norse "Saettr", meaning an area of summer pasture.

References

Notes

  1. ^ Mickle Fell in southern Teesdale is the highest point within the boundaries of the historic county of Yorkshire.

External links

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