Lake District With Hilleberg

Posted in Lake District With Hilleberg on May 18th, 2012 by David Murphy

 

On the 17th May 2012 myself Paul themuss Daniel Export Sales Rep for Hilleberg the TentMakers and a group of lads from George Fisher the Outdoor equipment shop whom are great retailer for Hilleberg Tents and other outdoor gear, we all met at a Campsite in the Lake District (after the Keswick Mountain Festival had been on up the road) to have a bit of crack, some booze and some food and stay the night in some Hilleberg Tents.

Me and Paul arrived at Keswich in the Lake District  had around 4pm ish and drove onto the Stonewaithe Campsite (it was raining as usual for the area) to be greeted by a lone man in his tent we sat there for a bit wondering if this was Daniel or someone from George Fisher maybe, on asking him he said he hadnt herd of Hilleberg and new nothin about our meeting which we were invited to.

So off we went to seekout some info at the nearest pub called The LangStrath Country Inn which whilst we were there we thought we would checkout the local Ale we asked some questions if anyone had known about a meeting with Hilleberg and George Fisher on the campsite just a few hundred yards down the rather bumpy road, knowone had herd anything, me and Paul were a little unsure what to expect here would there be Marquee tents serving mountains of food and beer with hundreds of people here ? we even considered the email we received to be a windup lol. With some phoning around from a very helpful woman in the pub whom put our minds to rest and said it was all true and soon enough a silver car past the pub window and she said he was waiting for us on the campsite.

 (From left to right) Daniel, Jon, Paul and Myself Daveswildcamping

So after just one pint of the fine Ale we walked over to be greeted by Daniel a very charming Scandinavia guy whom works in Export Sales for Hilleberg the famous tent makers this was something I was very looking forward to and couldnt be missed as I have been a fan of there tents for many years as my videos will show.

Me trying on the Hilleberg Bivanorak

We started by errecting some of the tents Daniel had brought a long opened some cans of lager he had with him and soon after three lads from George Fisher had turned up. We all had a wander around these fabulous tents whilst Daniel gave us a run down on them and explained how one person is involved with the full manufacture of each tent and their name is place on a tag inside the tent that they have made. I found this astonishing as  I have never noticed this on my old Akto and checked it when I got home and sure enough a name was on the tag “Helviina Saar” as you can see from my video, I really find this amazing as I no the care these people will take in making these tents as not only because there name is on but the sense of pride each individual would feel after being solely involved in making a product that will be used and cherished by someone on the other side of the world for many years, how satisfying that must feel.

After some cans of lager and a nice baracue and some more chat we decided to call it a night around 23:00 two of the members of our group couldn’t spend the night so we were down to just the four of us myself Paul, Daniel and Jon I had my usual poor sleep no fault of the great roomy tent I spent the night in which was the Nammatj 2 made from the Kerlon 1800 which is currently the strongest fabric used in Hilleberg tents and has the stronger 10mm Dac poles this is a tent I will be considering in the near future.

We had our alarm clocks set for 7am and had breakfast which was provided, we packed away the tents and off we went, Daniel was talking about us going over to Scandinavia sometime which I would love too I even offered to pay Pauls flight to come with me, watch this space 😉

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Wild Camping On Great Mell Fell Lake District

Posted in Great Mell Fell on September 11th, 2011 by David Murphy
Pre Great Mell Fell

On my way up Great Mell Fell in the Lake District Cumbria North West England today 12th September 2011( this blog is live as usual) with my mate Paul aka the muss. I picked this location as its west from our home town and Paul has been screaming to test his Vango Hurricane out in storm force conditions and my have I an evening in store for him and he tells me he wants a small hill as his fitness is not too good.

Tell you the truth if one of our tents has to blow away I am half hoping its mine as his been a two-man tent and mine been a tight single man tent I don’t fancy been squished in mine with him, his breath stinking of brandy and his snoring not to mention his smelly backside.

Our Route 

 On The Summit Of Great Mell Fell

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Heres what happened, We new what we were letting ourselves in for catching the tail end of hurricane Katia blown in from the States.
The purpose of this Wild Camp was to test Pauls Vango Hurricane and by god we did.
I arrived at Pauls at 12.10pm we finally were on our way after Paul packed some of his gear and arrived at our destination around 3pm. I was keep saying how lovely this hill is the wind blowing the grass and patches of trees scattered it look very idealic.
At first the wind didn’t appear very strong at all then by we were half way up we recorded around 63mph on Pauls Kestrel wind gauge.
It was tuff standing up sometimes having to spread one leg out behind us to keep the wind from sweeping us off our feet, I have never experienced winds so powerful.
We reached the summit of Great Mell Fell not a big Hill by anyone’s standards, we stood there for a while pondering what to do, do we go for it and pitch on the top or head down in a more sheltered spot, we headed back down and after deciding the lower location lost views over at least one direction we headed back to the top.

My Hilleberg Akto In 80mph Winds

I proceed to pitch the Hilleberg Akto with Paul sitting on the flysheet whilst I pegged down the corners, standing watching my poor Akto get battered we recorded 79.1 mph as you will see in my video.

Pauls Kestrel Wind Speed Meter
We then started working on the Vango Hurrricane, when he pulled all these poles out of his bag I thought to myself no way on earth this is going up, frantically holding onto the canvass, a few bent poles later we gave up never even raising it off the floor we decided to head to lower ground to pitch leaving my Akto up on the summit with my Osprey Argon inside we headed down. On discovering a snapped pole Paul discussed sleeping in the car I would have quite happily slept in my tent having the walkie talkies with us we could have at least kept in touch, I thought that wouldn’t be fair so we set off back to the summit took down the Akto and headed home. Both very sick by this time, our first Wildcamp we have had to leave for home.

Anyone reading this may think Paul is a little unlucky, well I think he’s not, for someone to lose a piece of gear a Satmap in this case, standing him at £400 with SD card for him to return the next day 200 miles round trip to find three cars parked in the very spot he lost it with a note on one of them asking him to contact them for a lost piece of hiking equipment. Paul I bet your relieved.

Just came across this forum members having a bit of a giggle at this blog post.

Great Mell Fell
Greatmellfell.jpg
Great Mell Fell from Gowbarrow Fell
Elevation 537 m (1,762 ft)
Prominence 198 m (650 ft)
Parent peak Helvellyn
Listing Marilyn (hill), Wainwright
Translation Large rounded bare hill (Scots Gaelic, English)
Pronunciation /ˌɡrt ˌmɛl ˈfɛl/
Location
Great Mell Fell is located in Lake District
Great Mell Fell
Cumbria,  England
Range Lake District, Eastern Fells
OS grid NY397254
Coordinates 54°37′12″N 2°55′59″W / 54.62°N 2.933°W / 54.62; -2.933Coordinates: 54°37′12″N 2°55′59″W / 54.62°N 2.933°W / 54.62; -2.933
Topo map OS Explorer OL5, Landranger 90

Great Mell Fell is a hill in the Eastern Fells of the English Lake District. It is a north-eastern outlier of the Helvellyn range, but, like its twin Little Mell Fell, is isolated from its fellows, standing in the middle of a flat plain. Presenting a symmetrical domed profile from almost all aspects, Great Mell Fell conspires to appear almost artificial, akin to jelly turned out of a giant mould.

Topography and land use

The hill lies on a low ridge, barely perceptible in places, which provides the connection between the Northern and Eastern Fells. This watershed runs from Bowscale Fell, across Eycott Hill to Great Mell Fell, and then up the north eastern ridge of Great Dodd. It forms the boundary between the Derwent/Cocker system in the west and the wide catchment of the Eden Valley.

To the north west of the fell is an old rifle range, now disused but still with some fittings in evidence. This was once a reason to declare Great Mell Fell strictly off limits, but this is not the case nowadays and the fell is free land. The National Trust currently owns the fell above the fenceline.

Great Mell Fell is extensively planted with Scots pines on the east, and occasional trees dot the fell all around the base. Near the summit are a few stunted larches, blown almost horizontal by the prevailing winds.[1]

Summit and view

The summit bears a small cairn built on top of a mound. The Ordnance Survey maps identify this as a tumulus and it is believed to have been a Bronze Age burial mound.[1]

Due to its isolation from higher ground, Great Mell Fell is a Marilyn, and an excellent viewpoint.[2]

Ascents

The fell can be climbed most easily via a path from Brownrigg Farm to the south east, and additional access can be gained through the old rifle range.[1] There is also a footpath which circles the base of the fell, passing largely through woods and providing an enjoyable low level walk.

References

  1. ^ a b c Richards, Mark: Near Eastern Fells: Collins (2003): ISBN 0-00-711366-8
  2. ^ Alfred Wainwright: A Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells, Book 1: ISBN 0-7112-2454-4


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Wild Camping On Grasmoor Lake District

Posted in Grasmoor Lake District on July 25th, 2011 by David Murphy

 

On the 18th September 2011 I parked along side Crummock Water in the Lake District to hike up to Grasmoor for a bit of Wildcamping on the summit.
Walking on Lad Hows Ridge between Cinderdale Beck on the left and Rannerdale Beck to my right, the summit is only 1.6 miles away.

I arrived and parked along side Crummock Water around 4.30pm I purposely left it late been a sunday I didnt want to arrive on the summit too early as I have done in the past, Ingleborough to name one where I was hanging around for hours before I was able to pitch without scores of hikers on the summit, this time was a miss judgement.
I didnt estimate the time it would take to the summit via lad Hows Ridge it was a challenge I didnt expect, very tiring on the legs and some scrambling near the top was needed.
Near dark on reaching the summit entering low cloud my great views a few hundred feet lower had gone wish I put my tent up lower down when I said in my video would have witnessed a great sunset  instead rain and wind and no views this brings back many bad memories with Paul lol
I proceeded to errect the Akto in thick fog by this time, and thought to myself I would get a brew of tea on quick sharp then Daves Wild Camping Kitchen was in full swing on the menu this even was Sheperds Pie and Chicken Korma “Pack’n’ Go” from Be-Well Ltd and how nice of a change for me they were, easy cooked with 350ml of boiling water stir and leave to stand for 6 mins.
After spending all the evening a prisoner in my tent due to rain I read the newspaper and then it was time to retire, I woke several times during the night to look out the opening in the top of my door hoping but not expecting to see stars only to see the same fog, it never shifted all night.

Morning came I had my alarm set for 6.20am to catch what I didnt really expect to see, the sunrise and there was no change at all a thick covering no views whatsoever, I turn back over to sleep till around 9am when I got up to my breakfast, Cereal Start “Pack’ n’ Go” by Be-Well ltd.

 I started to packup my tent then the heavens opened I got soaked 🙁 on walking back to the car I was hoping I didnt leave the headlights on, all was well.

Thanks for reading and supporting my website with your comments, till next time,

David Murphy
Daves Wildcamping

My Route up Grasmoor

Grasmoor Summit Shelter

Hilleberg Akto Summit of Grasmoor

My Akto On Grasmoor

View of Crummock & Buttermere

View from Lad How on way Up to Grasmoor

View from to Grasmoor Summit

Waterfall on way back down

My Actual Route

 

Grasmoor
Grasmoor.jpg
The huge bulk of the Grasmoor mountain seen over the Crummock Water valley
Elevation 852 m (2,795 ft)
Prominence 519 m (1,703 ft)
Parent peak Scafell Pike
Listing Marilyn, Wainwright, Hewitt, Nuttall
Location
Grasmoor is located in Lake District
Grasmoor
Cumbria,  England
Range Lake District, North Western Fells
OS grid NY174203
Coordinates 54°34′16″N 3°16′45″W / 54.57115°N 3.27918°W / 54.57115; -3.27918Coordinates: 54°34′16″N 3°16′45″W / 54.57115°N 3.27918°W / 54.57115; -3.27918
Topo map OS Landranger 89, 90, Explorer OL4

Grasmoor is a mountain in the north-western part of the Lake District, northern England. It is the highest peak in a group of hills between the villages of Lorton, Braithwaite and Buttermere, and overlooks Crummock Water.

Grasmoor is distinguished by its steep western flank, dropping dramatically to Crummock Water. This face is however not suitable for rock climbers as there is little clean rock, although Alfred Wainwright describes a challenging route up the face in his Pictorial Guides to the Lakeland Fells.[1] To the east the fell is linked to others by Crag Hill and Coledale Hause. Grasmoor is also home to the most extensive scree slopes in the North Western Fells.

Name

Grasmoor takes its name from the Old Norse element grise, meaning wild boar. This element appears in other Lake District place names, including Grisedale Pike and Grizedale Forest.[1]

Topography

The North Western Fells occupy the area between the rivers Derwent and Cocker, a broadly oval swathe of hilly country, elongated on a north-south axis. Two roads cross from east to west, dividing the fells into three convenient groups. The central sector, rising between Whinlatter Pass and Newlands Pass, includes Grasmoor.

The highest ground in the North Western Fells is an east-west ridge in this central sector, beginning with Grasmoor above Crummock Water and then gradually descending eastwards over Crag Hill, Sail, Scar Crags and Causey Pike. Grasmoor has the greatest elevation, although Crag Hill stands at the hub of the range.

From the valley floor near Little Town at the eastern end, the ridge requires four miles (6 km) of gradual ascent to attain the summit of Grasmoor. Starting at the shores of Crummock Water in the west, the same is achieved by a single slope of scree in less than a quarter of the distance. Grasmoor is Lakeland's terminal height par excellence.

The summit area is a gently domed promenade of moss and short grass,[1] running along the ridgeline with a narrow constriction in the middle. This is created primarily by the scooped-out bowl of Dove Crags on the northern face. To the east of this plateau are broad smooth slopes descending to a wide unnamed col at 2,368 ft (722 m). This connects onward to Crag Hill. At the western end the summit area narrows, culminating at the subsidiary top of Grasmoor End (2,445 ft) which crowns the western face. Great fans of scree descend to the lakeside road below. Grasmoor has one minor ridge which descends south westward over Lad Hows (1,397 ft) before a steeper fall to the valley floor.

To the south of Grasmoor is the valley of Rannerdale, which flows to Crummock Water between Lad Hows and the neighbouring Wandope. This drainage is supplemented by Cinderdale Beck, separating Lad Hows from the main body of the fell. The northern flank of the ridge stands above Liza Beck. This stream also makes due west for Crummock Water, but is diverted northward by the low top of Lanthwaite Hill to join the Cocker after its exit from the lake. An area of lowland to the north west is thus annexed to Grasmoor from the natural territory of Whiteside.

Geology

The surface rocks of Grasmoor are composed primarily of the Ordovician Kirkstile Formation. These are laminated mudstone and siltstone, typical of the Skiddaw range.[2] There is no history of mining beneath the slopes of Grasmoor.[3]

Summit and view

The top of the fell lies toward the western end of the summit plateau, marked by a huge sprawling cairn. There are many smaller cairns and the top is characterised by sheep-mown grass.[1] The view is extensive although robbed of some foreground by the extent of the summit. All of the major Lakeland ranges are in sight with the exception of the Far Eastern Fells, with High Stile above Crummock Water perhaps the highpoint.[1] This is best seen from the western end of the plateau.[4]

Ascents

The obvious way is direct up the screes from Lanthwaite on the Crummock Water road, picking through the rock scenery above to appear on Grasmoor End from the north west. This involves 2,000 ft (610 m) of ascent in about half a mile. From the same starting point a detour along Liza Beck/ Gasgale Gill can be used to give access to the northern slopes. A way can then be found almost direct to the summit around the rim of Dove Crags. From Rannerdale a choice of routes arises, either climbing the Lad Hows ridge or following Red Gill a little to the west. Finally Coledale Hause can be used to gain the main ridge between Crag Hill and Grasmoor. This can be reached from Lanthwaite or as the first objective of a longer march from Braithwaite in the east. Coledale Hause connects to Hopegill Head and the fells to the north, providing further indirect possibilities.[1][4] The summit was conquered by a Rolls Royce in 1982.[citation needed]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Alfred Wainwright: A Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells, Book 6, The North Western Fells: Westmorland Gazette (1964): ISBN 0-7112-2459-5
  2. ^ British Geological Survey: 1:50,000 series maps, England & Wales Sheet 29: BGS (1999)
  3. ^ Adams, John: Mines of the Lake District Fells: Dalesman (1995) ISBN 0-85206-931-6
  4. ^ a b Bill Birkett: Complete Lakeland Fells: Collins Willow (1994): ISBN 0-00-713629-3

External links

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Hedgehope Hill The Cheviots

Posted in Hedgehope Hill Cheviots on June 24th, 2011 by David Murphy

Wild Camp 26th June 2011 Alone on Hedgehope Hill in the Cheviots.

I set off on my one hour twenty minutes drive to a place called Langleeford and Harthope Burn a love valley in The Cheviots my sat nav took me on this track off the A697 to North Middleton which wasnt really suitable for my car, after coming to a grinding halt moving forward or backward was making a scraping noise underneath on investigation there was a boulder jamed between my exhaust and petrol tank not good.
Taking another turn brought me in this nice place after parking up I was on my way upto Hedgehope Hill where I would spend the night on the summit, a wrong path and half eaten by swarms of flies and covered in mud off boggy ground it was hard going under feet I reach the base of the hill.
The hill proved very steep but seemed to go on forever longer than I expected, on climbing The Cheviot years before from the steapest side this didnt appear any less tiring.
After another few sprays of my Insect repellent, this by now had wash off my sunscreen, I arrived at the summit to strong winds which were only really present where I wanted to pitch my tent.

“Just got to summit about 4.20pm, winds are so strong I’m hiding in the wind shelter dare not take my tent out of the backpack its that bad, this is not like me. I would say for certain this has to be the strongest I have witnessed this shelter is a godsend”. That was the comment on my live blog 🙂

I waited about and hour or two huddled amonst the rocky shelter where it was warm and wind free I made a brew of tea and had a tuna steak and sweetcorn and pondered. I decided to go for it pegging out my Akto I proceeded to slide through the pole and couldnt manage to clip it into the cup, seemed to be about 3 inches extra pole, I stuggled for a while on two occasions and gave up If I proceeded I think I would have ended up damaging the pole, back to another brew in the shelter to watch my poleless tent get lashed about, I gave this plenty of thought I really liked where I was pitched but had to bite the bullet and grab tight a hold of the guy wires unpeg the tent and take it about 30ft away on the east side of the shelter where the wind barely exsisted.
Tent up it was now about 9.30pm out came the Steak and stir-fry and another brew.
Soaking in the views I new the view of a nice sunset wouldnt happen for me, one there was low cloud over the horizon and two there was a huge hill called The Cheviot in front of me.
I retired to my sleeping bag around 11.30 I think, I tossed and turned a few hours which what I believe was zero sleep, I notice a few flashes of lightening on the coast south east of me this was 2.30am I sat there with the door open and watched it become lighter, I was out the tent by 3.30am taking some snaps, packed my tent away about 5am and was off to meet the flies whom were waiting for me in the hundreds buzzing around my head the whole way down to the car,  the route back was about a mile less and much easier going that the one a took up, you will be able to see this from the screenshots from my satmap.

Thanks for all of you that took part in posting comments on my live blog it was really good banter and I really enjoyed reading them it passed the night away well 🙂

Video will appears  soon. 

 

Hedgehop Hill Trig Point

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Hedgehope Hill Route 3.05 miles

Struggling getting Pole In wish I’d left it till later.

 
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Steak

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It’s Up Haha

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Yum Stir Fry

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As Live as it gets taken 22.10

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3am Cannot sleep am amazed at how light it is outside.

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3.20am My view Outside The Tent

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3.20am My view Outside The Tent

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4.53am Worth Waiting For

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5am my last am off 🙂

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5.55am Cloud Inversion 🙂

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Route Up Hedgehope Hill

 

Route Back from Hedgehope Hill

 Hedgehope Hill Video

Part One

Part Two

Coordinates: 55°28′19″N 2°05′25″W / 55.47195°N 2.09039°W / 55.47195; -2.09039

Hedgehope Hill
Hedgehope Hill is located in Northumberland
Hedgehope Hill

 Hedgehope Hill shown within Northumberland
OS grid reference NT9438619796
List of places: UK • England • Northumberland

Hedgehope Hill is a mountain in the Cheviot Hills of North Northumberland in North East England and categorised as a Hewitt.

At a height of 714 metres (2,343 ft) and a distance of about 3 miles (4.8 km) from the Scottish border, it is best climbed from Langleeford in the Harthorpe Valley, over which it looms. A slightly gentler climb, though a longer distance is from Linhope, approaching from the south east. An alternative route to the summit could involve a long days climb of both the Cheviot and Hedgehope Hill starting and finishing at Langleeford. It is a steep climb from any approach, best reserved for fitter walkers though the steepest inclines are not long in distance.

Hedgehope has steeper sides than the taller but flatter topped Cheviot and affords excellent views on all sides. On a clear day, views stretch to Blyth down the coastline up to 40 miles (60 km) away.

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Wildcamping on Randygill Top Howgill Fell

Posted in Randygill Top on April 20th, 2011 by David Murphy

20th April 2011 Me and Paul camping on summit of Randygill Top I didnt expect to be back in the area so soon from my Yarlside wildcamp, but Paul needed it after nearly crying after seeing the images appear on my live blog on Sunday, checkout Pauls vid here.

Summit of Randygill Top

Drinking the booze

Looking over to Yarlside and Kensgriff from summit of Randygill Top

A fine cut of Sirloin

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Hi Terry, this was for terrybnd live

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Sitting in tent finishing off booze and watching loads of stars

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Goodnight 🙂

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On the way back we took the different path and came right past this building which is abandoned

Actual Route Take

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Helvellyn Striding Edge and Wildcamping On Summit

Posted in Helvellyn Lake District on March 30th, 2011 by David Murphy

On the 16th Oct 2010 I left my car behind at a campsite where I camped the first night, I paid extra to leave my car a second night.

 

  Hole in the wall below

 

From then on you see the scary ridges of Striding Edge which for some reason my camera never left my pocket I think it was the fear of needing both my hands the whole way up, a big regret not getting some photos or video footage of the famous scramble.

 Some summit photos as u can see the usual poor weather.

 Before you ask that’s not my dog it was following me all over the summit it belonged to a gentleman, him and his son was also on the summit at the same time as me, I think it could smell my steak in my backpack 🙂 

 

Screenshots below of my satmap on way to Helvellyn

Checkout my Vid and thanks for viewing.

Helvellyn
Helvellyn(SimonLedingham)Dec2004.jpg
Helvellyn from the air in December. Red Tarn (centre) is flanked by Striding Edge (left) and Swirral Edge
Elevation 950 m (3,117 ft)
Prominence 712 m (2,336 ft)
Parent peak Scafell Pike
Listing Marilyn, Hewitt, Wainwright, Historic County Top
Translation Yellow upland[citation needed] (Cumbric)
Location
Helvellyn is located in Lake District
Helvellyn
Cumbria,  England
Range Lake District, Eastern Fells
OS grid NY342151
Coordinates 54°31′38″N 3°00′58″W / 54.527232°N 3.016054°W / 54.527232; -3.016054Coordinates: 54°31′38″N 3°00′58″W / 54.527232°N 3.016054°W / 54.527232; -3.016054
Topo map OS Landrangers 90
Listed summits of Helvellyn
Name Grid ref Height Status
Helvellyn Lower Man NY337155 925 m (3,035 ft) Nuttall
Striding Edge NY350149 863 m (2,831 ft) Nuttall

Helvellyn (Archaic: Helvillon, probably from Cumbric: hal (moor) + velyn (yellow)) is a mountain in the English Lake District, the apex of the Eastern Fells. At 950 metres (3,117 ft) above sea level, it is the third highest peak in both the Lake District and England. The traditional border of Cumberland and Westmorland lies along the Helvellyn Ridge.

[edit] Topography

The peak of Helvellyn is the highest on the north-south ridge situated between the Thirlmere valley to the west, and Patterdale to the east. This ridge continues north over Helvellyn Lower Man, White Side, Raise, Stybarrow Dodd, Great Dodd and Clough Head, and south leads to Nethermost Pike and Dollywaggon Pike.

The eastern side of the fell is geographically the most dramatic. Two sharp arêtes lead off the summit, Striding Edge and Swirral Edge, either side of Red Tarn. The knife-edged Striding Edge provides one of the best-known scrambles in Lakeland, while the Swirral Edge ridge leads to the conical summit of Catstycam.

Nestling between the encircling arms of Helvellyn's two edges is Red Tarn. This pool is named for the colour of the surrounding screes rather than its water and contains brown trout and schelly, a fresh-water herring. The depth of Red Tarn is now about 80 feet (25m), although in the mid-19th century it was dammed with boulders to increase capacity.[1] This was carried out to provide additional water to the Greenside lead mine in Glenridding and the water race is still visible as it crosses the slope of Birkhouse Moor.

Helvellyn from Red Tarn

A second tarn once existed in Brown Cove between Swirral Edge and Lower Man, but this now is reduced to a couple of small pools widening the stream. Brown Cove Tarn was another creation of the Greenside mine after a stone-faced dam was built around 1860. The dam is still in place, but water now leaks through the base and the extended tarn-bed is a smooth patch of luxuriant turf. A water leat passing beneath the north face of Catstycam to Red Tarn Beck can still be traced, although it is now in ruins.[1][2] Water from Brown Cove and Red Tarn unites beyond Catstycam to form Glenridding Beck, flowing on through the village to Ullswater.

The western slopes are relatively shallow and partially forested, with many gills leading down to the Thirlmere valley.

A panoramic view of the ascent of Helvellyn with Striding Edge on the left, then a steep scramble to the summit followed by a scrambling descent via Swirrel Edge on the right, leading to Catstycam.
The summit, looking north-west

The summit of Helvellyn takes the form of a broad plateau about 500 metres (1,640 ft) long. The highest point is marked by a cairn and a cross-shaped dry stone shelter; to the north is an Ordnance Survey [[trig point], slightly lower than the summit at 949 m (3,114 ft).

There is a subsidiary top, Helvellyn Lower Man, about a third of a mile to the north-west. Its summit is small compared to the plateau of Helvellyn and offers better views north-westward, as the ground falls steeply away from it on this side.

According to Ordnance Survey maps there is a bridleway along the full length of the Helvellyn range taking in a number of Wainwrights. This can be traversed by mountain bike and the usual route is South to North starting from Mill Bridge. This challenging six-hour circular route is 16 miles off road and 10 on road.

Geologically, the summit area and Striding Edge are formed by the Deepdale formation of the Borrowdale Volcanic Group. This consists of volcaniclastic sandstone with some intercalcated tuff, pebbley sandstone breccia, and lapilli-tuff. Underlying this is the Helvellyn formation of dacitic lapilli-tuff.[3]

[edit] Striding Edge

Striding Edge from Helvellyn

Striding Edge is a classic scrambling route on Helvellyn, linking the summit ridge of Birkhouse Moor to Helvellyn's summit by what becomes a sharp arête.

Striding Edge begins at Hole-in-the-Wall and then stretches for over a mile to the Helvellyn summit plateau. The initial part of the ridge is relatively rounded and has a good path running along the right hand side. This all changes upon reaching High Spying How, which at 863 m (2,831 ft) is the highest point on the ridge. At this point a narrow path continues closely to the top of the ridge which becomes increasingly narrow. Scramblers, however, will move to the top of the ridge and walk at the very top of the arête.

The side path continues until near the end of the ridge where it switches over to the left hand side. Scramblers are forced to descend a short gully down the last tower on the ridge. At this point the ridge joins to the main Helvellyn massif. All that remains is a walk or scramble up loose rocky terrain to reach the summit plateau around two hundred metres from the summit. Typically a cornice will form here in the winter and can represent the most dangerous part of the hike.

Striding Edge is a notorious accident spot among hikers and scramblers. Conditions on the ridge in early 2008 were described as the worst in thirty years by fell top assessor Craig Palmer. In winter conditions the climb from Striding Edge up to the summit plateau can involve an icy traverse of a dangerous cornice. Without an ice axe or crampons this presents a serious obstacle. Two walkers died after falling from the ridge in separate incidents in the following weeks.[4] Another walker died after falling from Striding Edge in May 2008.[5]

A 360 degree view from the middle of striding edge. Helvellyn is the highest summit just to the right of centre. Red Tarn is on the right and Ullswater and the village of Glenridding are visible on the horizon along the far left corner

[edit] Fell top assessors

The Lake District national park authority has two 'Fell top assessors' who ascend Helvellyn daily during the winter months of December to March.[6] Their job is to check the weather conditions at the summit and write a report containing information such as temperature, windchill, windspeed, snowdepth, and any dangers such as unstable snow or avalanche hazard and icy footpaths. This report is put on the Weatherline, which is a Met Office mountain weather forecast and is available on the internet, by telephone and at local shops and tourist information centres.[7] This information is important for people who go out winter hillwalking and climbing as it can help them plan their routes and to get an idea of the mountain conditions.

[edit] Camping on Helvellyn

Because of the picturesque scenery that Helvellyn offers, many people camp on Helvellyn throughout the year. Many campers will set up camp around Red Tarn as this gives the best views of Striding Edge, Red Tarn, and the summit of Helvellyn itself.

The weather should be taken into consideration when deciding to camp on Helvellyn. The weather can change suddenly, mist is also a problem at times. Although wild camping often is tolerated in the upland areas of the Lake District, camping wild is not legal without the permission of the landowner.[8] No trace of the campsite should be left: this includes litter, ground disturbance, and human waste.

[edit] History

Wordsworth on Helvellyn (1842) by Benjamin Robert Haydon

Helvellyn is strongly associated with the poet William Wordsworth, who used to climb the mountain regularly. Benjamin Robert Haydon's painting Wordsworth on Helvellyn epitomises Romanticism in portraiture. In a sonnet that celebrates both Wordsworth and Haydon, John Keats speaks of the former "on Helvellyn's summit, wide awake..."[9] Wordsworth wrote about the mountain several times. In particular he commemorated the death of the artist, Charles Gough, a tourist in the Lake District. Gough set out with his dog to cross Striding Edge to reach the peak of Helvellyn. He perished there and his dog stood at his side for three months before his corpse was found. A plaque commemorating this event can be found close to the peak.

The somewhat flat summit made the first British mountain-top landing of a plane possible, when John F. Leeming and Bert Hinkler successfully landed and took off again, in 1926. An academic, E.R. Dodds (1893–1979), Professor of Greek at the University of Birmingham, recorded the event, signing an old bill (receipt) to that effect, before they took off again. The event is marked by a slate which reads: "The first aeroplane to land on a mountain in Great Britain did so on this spot. On December 22nd 1926 John Leeming and Bert Hinkler in an AVRO 585 Gosport landed here and after a short stay flew back to Woodford".

The western slopes bear witness to historic mining activity. Helvellyn (or Wythburn) mine operated from 1839 until 1880, after which the land was acquired for the Thirlmere reservoir scheme. Four levels can be found along the course of Mines Gill, from where lead was extracted. Despite the sizeable workings the venture was never a commercial success.[2]

[edit] References

  1. ^ a b Blair, Don; Exploring Lakeland Tarns; Lakeland Manor Press (2003); ISBN 0-9543904-1-5
  2. ^ a b Adams, John: Mines of the Lake District Fells, Dalesman (1995); ISBN 0-85206-931-6
  3. ^ Woodhall, DG: Geology of the Keswick District- a brief explanation of the geological map. 1:50,000 Sheet 29: British Geological Survey (2000)
  4. ^ Walkers warned after fells deaths - BBC news
  5. ^ Tributes to 300 ft (91 m) fall walker Sid - Cumberland News
  6. ^ Helvellyn Fell Top Assessors
  7. ^ *Lake District weather forecast with daily weather report from Helvellyn December to March
  8. ^ http://www.lakedistrict.gov.uk/index/visiting/planningyourvisit/accommodation/wildcamping.htm
  9. ^ http://www.bartleby.com/126/27.html

[edit] External links

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WildCamping On Ingleborough Yorkshire Dales

Posted in Ingleborough on March 30th, 2011 by David Murphy

On the 30th August 2010 I set off alone to climb Ingleborough in the Yorkshire Dales

 

 

 

 

 and found a lovely spot about 8ft off the summit so I pitched my tent on this little shelf.

 

 

 

shelter from the wind in one direction and a marvellous view over to the other directions, apart from forgetting my cup for my tea and havent to use a collapsible nalgene bottle, on getting on settled i proceeded to get out my cooking pots and starting cooking my tea.

 

A view from the summit 

 

A rare occasion to lap up a sunset 

 

 this has to be one of my best experiences wildcamping I have had, watch my video and make your own mind up. 

 

Part One Wildcamping on Ingleborough

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Part Two Wildcamping on Ingleborough

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Ingleborough
Ingleborough from Tatham Fells.jpg
Ingleborough, as seen from Tatham Fells
Elevation 723 m (2,372 ft)
Prominence c. 427 m
Parent peak Cross Fell
Location
Ingleborough is located in Yorkshire Dales
Ingleborough
Yorkshire Dales, England
OS grid SD740745
Coordinates 54°09′57.32″N 2°23′51.02″W / 54.1659222°N 2.3975056°W / 54.1659222; -2.3975056Coordinates: 54°09′57.32″N 2°23′51.02″W / 54.1659222°N 2.3975056°W / 54.1659222; -2.3975056
Topo map OS Landranger 98

Ingleborough is the second highest mountain in the Yorkshire Dales. It is one of the Yorkshire Three Peaks, the other two being Whernside (736) and Pen-y-ghent(694). Ingleborough is frequently climbed as part of the Yorkshire Three Peaks Challenge, which is a 24-mile (38-km) circular challenge walk starting and finishing in Horton in Ribblesdale. If done anti-clockwise Ingleborough is the last mountain climbed, and ascent is from Chapel-le-Dale.

Name

The second part of the name Ingleborough is derived from the Old English word burh, meaning "a fortified place"; in this case, a hill fort. On the top of Ingleborough the remains of an old walled enclosure have been discovered inside which foundations of Iron Age huts have been found.

Geography

Ingleborough is situated in the south-western corner of the Yorkshire Dales, being at the highest point of a large triangle of land with corners at Ingleton, Ribblehead and Settle. The hill is connected to its nearest higher neighbour, Whernside, by a low col or mountain pass at Ribblehead at approximately 296m.

Ingleborough throws out a ridge to the north-east which develops into a summit, Simon Fell, and another summit further down, Park Fell. An ill-defined ridge going south-east from the summit breaks into two large areas of limestone plateau at about 1,300 feet (400 m); both plateaux contain summits and these are the subsidiary summits of Norber and Moughton. On the slopes of the former are the famed Norber Boulders. Continuing south-east the high land is broken by a divide which carries the minor road from Austwick to Helwith Bridge. On the other side of the divide rises the low summit of Smearsett Scar along with its subsidiaries, Pot Scar and Giggleswick Scar; from here the land falls away to the River Ribble at Settle.

On the western side of Ingleborough is a large limestone plateau appropriately known as White Scars, below which runs the 6.5 kilometres (4.0 mi)[1]White Scar Caves, the entrance series of which has been developed as a show cave. The plateau is bounded by Raven Scar, the longest unbroken cliff in the district, and on top of it is the pothole of Meregill Hole. On the southern side (to the west of the Clapham path) is a similar plateau, this one containing potholes such as Fluted Hole and Pillar Hole.

The unassuming but cavernous Juniper Gulf.

The plateau to the north of Norber, an area known as The Allotment, is particularly rich in potholes; one of these, Long Kin East, can be followed by all and sundry for a distance of 100 yards (91 m). Also located here is Juniper Gulf, which descends 420 feet (130 m) underground through an arduous rift, dominated by a small geological fault.

The Smearsett Scar region is not devoid of interesting features either; here can be found the Celtic Wall, the Ebbing and Flowing Well (which has now stopped ebbing and flowing) and a glacial hollow known as the Happy Valley.

Ascents

There are several popular hillwalking routes to its summit. The most frequently-used starting point is probably the village of Ingleton, which lies about 4 miles (6 km) to the southwest. An ascent from here is about 7.5 miles (12.1 km) there and back. The route follows a walled lane, Fell Lane, before emerging onto a flat area, Crina Bottom, scattered with potholes including the considerable Quaking Pot. A steep climb through the limestone cliffs leads to the summit.

The hill may also be climbed from Horton in Ribblesdale six miles (10 km) to the east, following a route crossing extensive areas of limestone pavement in the region of Sulber Nick. This is the route of descent of the Three Peaks Walk and has been heavily improved by the National Trust after going in just thirty years from no path at all to a serious example of footpath erosion. Another route on this flank is from the isolated farmstead of Crummack.

There is also a route from Clapham that follows the Ingleborough Estate nature trail, before passing the Craven Fault, the showcave of Ingleborough Cave, the ravine of Trow Gill and the pothole of Gaping Gill. It then crosses a marshy area and climbs up to the shoulder of Little Ingleborough before following the ridge to the summit. The return to Clapham can be varied by taking the Horton-in-Ribblesdale path for two miles (3 km) before striking south through more limestone pavement to the small top of Norber; a descent past the famed Norber erratics ( Norber Boulders ) finishes a walk of eleven and half miles that Wainwright considered to be the finest walk in the Yorkshire Dales.

There is a northern route from the Hill Inn at Chapel-le-Dale, the route of ascent used by the Three Peaks Walk and the shortest way up the mountain, being just 3 miles (4.8 km) from village to summit. An interesting walk across a limestone plateau with many caves, including Great Douk Cave and Meregill Hole, is followed by a steep and tedious climb to the shoulder of the subsidiary summit of Simon Fell at 2,000 feet (610 m), a mile to the north-east of the summit. The passage from here to the summit is high-level and exhilarating, but requires some scrambling.

Finally there are unwaymarked routes heading NE across Simon Fell and Souther Scales Fell both of which reach a steep descent just beyond the triangulation pillar on Park Fell to reach the Right of Way at New Close. Both routes give commanding views of the area.

The summit

The trig point and windshelter.

The summit is a broad plateau half a mile in circumference carpeted with dry turf. There is an Ordnance Survey trig point (number S. 5619) at the highest point, near the south-western corner. Just to the north is a well-built windshelter with a view indicator or toposcope built into its centre. Between them is a large cairn. At the point where the Ingleton path reaches the summit rim is an even larger cairn; this, remarkably, is the remains of a battlemented round tower (a hospice), built in 1830. The celebrations on the day of its opening ceremony became so alcoholic, however, that parts of it were thrown down there and then, the rest being destroyed later. Along the northern and eastern edges is the shattered wall of a military camp, believed to be Roman. For the view, which is far-reaching and superb, see here. The hill fort which covers 15 acres (61,000 m2) and which the defensive wall can still be seen although much robbed for stone, contains the remains of several stone circles. It is now thought that this was in fact Celtic, the Brigantes tribe the largest tribe in Iron Age Britain a collection of smaller units amalgamated into one tribe. The fort was known to the Romans as the Kings fort. It may be that this was a base for Venutius after his 'divorce' from Cartimandua the Brigantes Queen who was a supporter of the Roman invaders, unlike Venutius who led several rebellions. What we do know is that this fort was used all year, which was unusual for such a location, but at the time of the Romans the climate was much milder, the Romans for example cultivated grapes in Newcastle.

Geology

The striking appearance of Ingleborough from all directions and from a great distance is due to the unusual geology of the underlying rock. The base of the mountain is composed of ancient Silurian and Ordovician rocks and it is on these that the village of Ingleton stands. A belt of Carboniferous Limestone, the 'Great Scar Limestone', some 600 feet (180 m) thick, lies on top of this. Due to the limestone's permeability, all the streams flowing down from the mountain are engulfed upon reaching it, falling into a number of potholes. Above lies the layered Yoredale Series of sedimentary rocks, predominantly shale and sandstone, and generally concealed by the peat but revealed in the escarpments about 1,700 feet (520 m) up. There are also layers of harder limestone sandwiched between the softer rocks which have been eroded faster, and which protect the layers beneath them, leading to the 'tiered' effect. The whole mountain, however, is protected from erosion by a cap of Millstone Grit, known as the Yoredale Series, approximately 100 feet (30 m) tall. The rock above the Millstone Grit layer has been eroded away, which explains the flatness of the summit. A good explanation of the geology and scenery of the area is given in Waltham.[2]

The view

Important mountain peaks visible from Ingleborough are listed here, clockwise from north, with their distance in miles and bearing in degrees. The furthest peak visible is Manod Mawr in Snowdonia, North Wales 103 miles (166 km) away on a bearing of 218 degrees.

North

East

South

West

Gallery

References

  1. ^ Brook, A; D. Brook; J. Griffith; M.H. Long (1991). Northern Caves Volume 2 The Three Peaks. Clapham, via Lancaster: Dalesman Publishing Company Ltd.. pp. 232–234. ISBN 1-85568-033-5.
  2. ^ Waltham, Tony (2007). The Yorkshire Dales: Landscape and Geology. Malmesbury, Wiltshire: Crowood Press. ISBN 978-1-86126-972-0.

External links

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Wildcamping on Whernside Yorkshire Dales

Posted in Whernside on March 30th, 2011 by David Murphy

 22 Oct 2010 me and my mate Paul set off for a Wildcamp on the summit of  Whernside in the Yorkshire Dales soon into our trip the weather made a turn for the worst on reaching the summit the weather was so poor we missed the Summit Trig Point which is as you no are usually a built up monument of stone, we thought after the fairly tiring climb they could have at least put something there for us. On reaching the summit we ran into darkness a long with the ever worsening weather, my satmap was telling me to head towards a very inviting lake/tarn where which we couldn’t actually see, we eventually pitched our tents near the lake after tramping through very wet bogs to get to it.

After probs the worse night I have experienced to date really bad winds and rain lashing the tent we awoke to not that very good of a view we decided to head off back to the path after packing up the tents we walked in a circle trying to find our way back on to the main path above us we walked a hundred yards or so and discovered the trig point that we had just walked past and couldn’t understand how we had missed it.

 

Watch My Vid Below

Whernside
Whernside and Ribblehead Viaduct.jpg
A snow covered Whernside and Ribblehead Viaduct seen from Ribblehead.
Elevation 736 m (2,415 ft)
Prominence 408 m (1,339 ft)
Parent peak Cross Fell
Listing Marilyn, Hewitt, County Top, Nuttall
Location
Whernside is located in Yorkshire Dales
Whernside
Yorkshire Dales, England
OS grid SD738814
Coordinates 54°13′40″N 2°24′12″W / 54.22764°N 2.40338°W / 54.22764; -2.40338Coordinates: 54°13′40″N 2°24′12″W / 54.22764°N 2.40338°W / 54.22764; -2.40338
Topo map OS Landranger 98

Whernside is a mountain in the Yorkshire Dales and is one of the Yorkshire Three Peaks, the other two being Ingleborough and Pen-y-ghent. It is the highest point in the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire,[note 1] with the summit lying on the county border with Cumbria.

In shape Whernside forms a long ridge, running roughly north–south.

Routes

There is a Right of Way footpath running from the east at Ribblehead that heads north via Smithy Hill, Grain Ings before turning west to Knoutberry Haw and then south to Whernside itself. From the summit the ROW heads initially south then steeply southwest down a stepped path to the small village of Bruntscar. If climbed as part of the Yorkshire Three Peaks Challenge (which is normally done anti-clockwise) Whernside will be climbed following the route from up Ribblehead to descend to Bruntscar.

There are however other routes up/down the mountain which are not Rights of Way.

A path heads directly west from the triangulation pillar to reach the road that is Deepdale Lane near White Shaw Moss.

An alternative route heads directly north across Knoutberry Haw to pass Whernside Tarns and reaches the Craven Way at Boot of the Wold.

Following the southern descent for 0.76 miles (1.22 km), instead of turning steeply southeast towards Bruntscar a path continues south running adjacent the wall passing Combe Scar and West Fell to reach the limestone pavements at Ewe's Top.

Finally, 275 yards (251 m) south of the triangulation pillar an old route (partly fenced off) descends (initially very steeply) for 1.3 miles (2 km) to reach a road 275 yards (251 m) southwest of Winterscales Farm, this is the old route of the Three Peaks Challenge. Walkers should select this route with care as it is no longer maintained, boggy, badly eroded and requires extreme care over the final steep ascent/descent. The current route of the Three Peaks fell race runs approximately 440 yards (400 m) north of this old ascent along open moor.

All paths are on Access Land and make an interesting change from the Right of Way ascents/descents.

A walk solely around Whernside starting at the road of The Station Inn, to the top of Whernside and back round through the farm gives a distance of roughly 8 and a half miles.

General

On a clear day the views from the summit to the west can be spectacular, with views of the Lake District and Morecambe Bay, including (with the aid of binoculars) Blackpool Tower, some 40 miles (64 km) away.

Whernside lies about 2 miles (3 km) northwest of Ribblehead Viaduct on the Settle–Carlisle Railway.

Whernside is sometimes confused with the lower peaks of Great Whernside 17 miles (27 km) away and Little Whernside, which are both to the east of Whernside. The word "Whern" is believed to refer to querns (millstones) whilst "side" is derived from the Norse "Saettr", meaning an area of summer pasture.

References

Notes

  1. ^ Mickle Fell in southern Teesdale is the highest point within the boundaries of the historic county of Yorkshire.

External links

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Hiking in the Cheviots and WildCamping

Posted in The Cheviots on March 28th, 2011 by David Murphy

In 2008 I set off from Wooler in Northumberland for a Hike through the Cheviot’s and a planned wild camp alone after around 5 miles hike i believe i had to find somewhere to pitch my tent, this was my first try of my Hilleberg Akto.

 

Been my first time out Wildcamping by myself I was a little nervous when in the pitch black with only the sound of a river next to me, in the morning I hiked up the Cheviot great views on the way up but i thought I would save my battery power for some better photos from the summit, which I was met with a flat boggy top with no views very disappointing.

 

The Cheviot
The Cheviot from Broadhope Hill.jpg
The Cheviot, from Broadhope Hill
Elevation 815 m (2,674 ft)
Prominence 556 m (1,824 ft)
Parent peak Broad Law
Listing Marilyn, Hewitt, County Top, Nuttall
Location
Location Cheviot Hills, England
OS grid NT909205
Topo map OS Landranger 74/75

The Cheviot is the highest summit in the Cheviot Hills in the far north of England, only 2 km from the Scottish border. It is the last major peak on the Pennine Way, if travelling from south to north, before the descent into Kirk Yetholm.

Other than the route via the Pennine Way, most routes up The Cheviot start from the Harthope Burn side to the northeast, which provides the nearest access by road. The summit is around 5 km from the road-end at Langleeford. There are routes following the ridges above either side of the valley, and a route that sticks to the valley floor until it climbs to the summit of The Cheviot from the head of the valley.

Although the Pennine Way itself does a two-mile out-and-back detour to the Cheviot, many walkers who come this way omit it, since the stage (the last) is 29 miles long.

The Pennine Way approaching the summit of The Cheviot

The summit of the Cheviot is very flat. It is an ancient, extinct volcano[citation needed]. It is covered with an extensive peat bog up to 2 m deep; the Northumberland National Park authority have laid down stone slabs on the main access footpath to prevent erosion damage to the peat and to make access to the summit safer for walkers.

North of the summit, in the peat bogs, are the remains of a crashed B-17 bomber, which hit the mountain due to a navigational error in World War II. The more recognisable pieces of wreckage have been removed, but pieces of the aircraft can still be found.

The landing gear of a B-17 bomber that crashed in World War II.

View

A smoke grenade found near the summit of The Cheviot. The area around the mountain is used for training by the British Army.

The view is obscured greatly by the flatness of the summit plateau. Nevertheless, on a clear day the following are visible (from west, clockwise); Broad Law, Moorfoot Hills, Pentland Hills, the Ochils, Lammermuir Hills, Lochnagar, Ros Hill, Long Crag, Urra Moor, Tosson Hill, Burnhope Seat, Cross Fell, Helvellyn, Scafell Pike, Skiddaw, Sighty Crag, Peel Fell, Queensberry.

External links

Coordinates: 55°28′42″N 2°08′44″W / 55.47823°N 2.14553°W / 55.47823; -2.14553

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