Lake District Near Catbells

Posted in Catbells Lake District on February 24th, 2013 by David Murphy

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Catbells
Cat Bells and Friars Crag.jpg
The classic view of Catbells from near Friars Crag on the opposite side of Derwent Water
Elevation 451 m (1,480 ft)
Prominence 86 m (282 ft)
Parent peak Dale Head
Listing Wainwright
Location
Catbells is located in Lake District
Catbells
Cumbria,  England
Range Lake District, North Western Fells
OS grid NY244199
Coordinates 54°34′07″N 3°10′15″W / 54.56865°N 3.17083°W / 54.56865; -3.17083Coordinates: 54°34′07″N 3°10′15″W / 54.56865°N 3.17083°W / 54.56865; -3.17083
Topo map OS Landrangers 89, 90, Explorer OL4

Catbells is a fell in the English Lake District in the county of Cumbria. It has a modest height of 451 metres (1,480 ft) but despite this it is one of the most popular fells in the area. It is situated on the western shore of Derwent Water within 3 miles (5 km) of the busy tourist town of Keswick. Its distinctive shape catches the attention of many visitors to the Lakes who feel compelled to climb to the summit after seeing it from the viewpoint of Friars Crag on the opposite side of Derwent Water. Renowned Lake District writer and walker Alfred Wainwright acknowledges the popularity of Catbells among fellwalkers of all ability by saying:

"It is one of the great favourites, a family fell where grandmothers and infants can climb the heights together, a place beloved. Its popularity is well deserved, its shapely topknott attracts the eye offering a steep but obviously simple scramble."

Name

The fell's unusual name may well have come from a distortion of "Cat Bields" meaning shelter of the wild cat, although this is not certain. The fell's name is sometimes written as Cat Bells and is so printed on some maps.

Topography

Catbells is the last fell on the ridge separating Derwent Water from the Newlands valley. It rises due south from Hawse End, reaching the summit in two distinct steps. The lower top is named Skelgill Bank. Beyond the summit of Catbells is the steep sided depression of Hause Gate, before the ridge broadens and twists south westward to Maiden Moor.

Geology

The Catbells ridge is an example of the Buttermere Formation, an olistostrome of disrupted, sheared and folded mudstone, siltstone and sandstone.[1]

Ascents

The ascent along the northern ridge facing the summit to the south

Nearly all ascents of Catbells start from Hawse End at the foot of the northern ridge; there is car parking here but the spaces soon get taken on busy summer days. Hawse End is also served by the Derwent Water Motor Launch and this enables visitors to Keswick to combine a sail on the lake with an ascent of the fell. Many walkers who reach the top of Catbells return to their starting point after admiring the view, however, strong walkers can continue along the ridge to take in the fells of Maiden Moor, High Spy, Dale Head, Hindscarth and Robinson to give a horseshoe walk which ends in the Newlands valley close to Hawse End.

Summit and view

The summit is all rock with many loose stones lying amid the small outcrops. The view from the top of Catbells gives a fine panorama which is dominated by the aerial view of Derwentwater. Bassenthwaite Lake, the Newlands Valley, Skiddaw and Keswick all show well to the north, while the view south has a fine vista of Borrowdale.

A 360 degree view from the summit of Catbells. The view North of the summit (middle of the image) takes in Skiddaw, Blencathra and Keswick on the edge of Derwentwater.

Mining

Although Catbells is renowned as a "family fell" it does have some dangers especially from the disused lead mines on its slopes. The Yewthwaite mine, which is on the western side of the fell has extensive spoil heaps and shafts. Many of the shafts were previously open and dangerous but most have now been blocked off. The Brandlehow and Old Brandley Mine worked a lode for lead ore on the Derwent Water (eastern) side of the fell. All three mines ceased production in the 1890s. On the lower slopes of the fell above Derwent Water stands Brackenburn Lodge, now holiday accommodation but formerly the home of Hugh Walpole who wrote the Herries series of books when he lived here from 1924 to his death in 1941.

Notes

  1. ^ British Geological Survey: 1:50,000 series maps, England & Wales Sheet 29: BGS (1999)

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The Calf Howgill Fells

Posted in The Calf Howgill Fells on October 15th, 2011 by David Murphy

On the 15th October I set off to Howgill Fells to hike up to the summit of The Calf and Wild Camp the night myself. Good weather is forcast I am looking forward to a possible view of a sunset and a starry night.

calf

My 4 mile Route to The Calf 

 I planned to do this trip a few weeks ago but just got around to it, in fact this is a hill I wanted to do way back when I done Fell Head lets face it you’re not a keen Howgills hiker unless you have done the daddy The Calf right!
I set off in plenty time this time in fact I got there a bit to early 12 o’clock I started the satmap at 12.16pm the hike over to The Calf was easy till I started the ascent and quickly released my fitness wasnt as good as when I done Grasmoor, Grasmoor was steeper and harder on foot this was all grass-covered like all the Howgill hills not like the rugged lakeland hills.
It took me 3 hours and 30 mins to reach the top this is pathetic lol total moving time of 1 hour 52 as seen on the satmap screenshots means I had nearly 1 and a half hours resting haha but hey I told you I had loads of time.
It was now nearly 5pm still loads of time to pitch and prepare for the sunset, I seen plenty of hikers this time around usually don’t see many in the Howgills.
There is a 360 view on the summit but only a small band of horizon as the hill-top is wide in places not my favorite type of hill I prefer the small top hills imagine a pyramid type summit that way your 360 angle of view is great.
This view was hampered mostly by low cloud and haze yet no cloud at all above me which ment a starry night not my best but ok I stood around looking at the stars for a good few hours and a few brews of yorkshire tea later I decided to retire to my sleeping bag and read the paper I continued to sit with the door open a future few hours admiring the moon a few bright stars I could see from my bed and enjoying a bit of banter on my live blog.
I awoke around 3am winds had increased which probs what awakened me, I immediately opened the vent in the top of my door to check on the sky and was disappointed in the blanket of fog that surrounded my tent I had hoped the clear skies would have carried on till morning which would have guaranteed me the sunrise I so wished to see, I had my alarm set for 7am just incase but it wasnt to be I turned over and went back to sleep till around 8.30 I crawled from my sleeping bag packed a few things away fired up the msr dragonfly stove and rashers of Danish bacon was on the menu washed down with a brew.
It was time just to sit around for a bit to see if the rain would halt and it did eventually I packed up and headed off 10.27am on the 4 miles back to the car as you can see from the satmap screens it only took me 2hrs 5 mins total time and 1 hour 30 mins moving time.

Thanks for reading, your comments are very welcome.

On Route to Summit

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The Calf Trig Point 

Akto on The Calf Summit


My Sunset Just before it disappeared into the cloud

Tarn on The Calf Summit

Another shot of the Tarn

I like this one of the Tarn

 Really Cold Out here

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Looking Fed up for some reason lol

image

Now Happy haha
image
Danish Bacon Breakfast
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Route Up left and Route Back on right here you can see the time differences.

 

 

 

The Calf
The Calf summit.jpg
The trig point at the summit, looking towards the distant Pennines.
Elevation 676 m (2,218 ft)
Prominence 383 m (1,257 ft)
Parent peak Cross Fell
Listing Marilyn, Hewitt, Nuttall
Location
The Calf is located in Yorkshire Dales
The Calf
Yorkshire Dales, Cumbria, England
OS grid SD667970
Coordinates 54°22′03″N 2°30′51″W / 54.36742°N 2.51403°W / 54.36742; -2.51403Coordinates: 54°22′03″N 2°30′51″W / 54.36742°N 2.51403°W / 54.36742; -2.51403
Topo map OS Landranger 98

The Calf, at 676 m, is the highest top in the Howgill Fells, an area of high ground in the north-west of the Yorkshire Dales in the county of Cumbria. It can be ascended from the town of Sedbergh to the south, by way of Cautley Spout from the east, or up the long valley of Langdale from the north. The Sedbergh ascent is the most popular, and has the distinction of being on good paths all the way.

The summit commands an extensive panorama, although foreground detail is obscured by the extreme flatness of the plateau. A twenty-mile skyline of the Lakeland peaks can be seen, as well as the Yorkshire Three Peaks and many of the nearer Howgill Fells.

Calders at 674 m is about 1 km SSE of the summit of The Calf. It is classified as a Hewitt.



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