Wild Boar Fell Yorkshire Dales

Posted in Wild Boar Fell on June 28th, 2011 by David Murphy

On the 4th June 2011 me and Paul left to do a Wildcamp on Wild Boar Fell in the Yorkshire Dales, I left my car at Pauls at 3pm to jump into his and we arrived approximately 5.30pm. We both agreed the weather wasnt about to change in the time we were here low cloud and fog covered the summit we hoped on a break in the fog which didnt come apart from brief glimpses of the ground below us.

 

After pitching our tents near the end of Wild Boar fell named The Nab we talked till about 12.30am in a wind chill of around -2 degrees whilst gulping down our booze which Paul always Insists on me bringing, this time it was white rum and coke. Morning came we were up early as Paul needed to be back home I lay awake all night as usual whilst he slept like a baby and boy did he rub it in. No sign of any sunrise as per usual we packed up our damp tents and off we went, a good time was had, plenty of laughs even though the weather was crap.

 

Me and Paul on Wild Bore Fell camped near the nab.

My Akto and Pauls Terra Nova Voyager Superlite

Tuna Steak and Sweetcorn yum.

Just reached the Summit of Wild Boar Fell

Wild Boar Fell Summit

Me and Paul at trig point

Wild Boar Fell Summit

Another Wild Boar Trig Point Shot

Wild Boar Fell Summit Trig Point

Knocking Back The Booze

Drink on Wild Boar Fell Summit

 

Above the Start Point on the left and right our Wildcamp Location

Wild Boar Fell
Wildboar pic.jpg
The summit trig point
Elevation 708 m (2,323 ft)
Prominence 344 m (1,129 ft)
Parent peak Cross Fell
Listing Marilyn, Hewitt, Nuttall
Location
Location North Yorkshire/Cumbria, England
Range Pennines
OS grid SD757988
Topo map OS Landranger 98

Wild Boar Fell is a mountain (or more accurately a fell) in Mallerstang on the eastern edge of Cumbria, England. At 708 metres (2,323 ft), it is either the 4th highest fell in the Yorkshire Dales or the 5th, whether counting nearby High Seat (709 m) or not. (In fact neither of these are, at present, in the Yorkshire Dales National Park, although there are plans to extend its boundaries in the near future to include Mallerstang). The nearest high point is Swarth Fell which is a mile-long (1.5 km) ridge to the south, at grid reference SD754965. To the east, on the opposite side of the narrow dale, are High Seat and Hugh Seat.

History

The fell gets its name from the wild boar which inhabited the area over 500 years ago.[1] But it is unusual, for this area of Viking settlement, that its old Norse name seems to have disappeared, whereas the names of many of its features, such as The Nab, Dolphinsty, etc., retain their Norse origin.

In earlier times, probably up to the mid nineteenth century, the Millstone Grit, or gritstone, which forms the flat top of the fell, was used for making millstones. Some partly formed millstones can be seen on the eastern flank of the fell - and also on the corresponding western flank of Mallerstang Edge on the opposite side of the dale. Sand (composed of Millstone Grit) from the beach of Sand Tarn was used by local people to sharpen knives and scythes; they made "strickles" by sticking the sand to wooden blocks with tar.

A tusk, claimed to be of "the last wild boar caught on the fell", is kept in Kirkby Stephen parish church.

During World War II Wild Boar Fell was sometimes used for training tank crews from the army base at Warcop in the handling of tanks in difficult terrain.

Geography

Wild Boar Fell is a dramatic sight and a landmark for many miles around. Approached from the north it gives the misleading impression that it is a peak (see photo, above left). But from the south of the dale at Aisgill its true profile is seen, not dissimilar to Ingleborough, with steep sides and a flat top (consisting of a cap of millstone grit).

The classic route for walking up Wild Boar is via the bridle way from Hazelgill Farm, ascending west to High Dophinsty before following Scriddles ridge top to Blackbed Scar. Once there you are on Wild Boar Fell's table top plateau, a rather boggy expanse. The summit is marked by a trig point and Sand Tarn is about 300 m (1,000 ft) to the west, just below the summit.

The views from the top make a spectacular panorama. The Howgills, Pennines, the Lake district fells, the Yorkshire Three Peaks can all be seen and, on a clear day, there is even a glimpse of the sea at Morecambe Bay.

A common feature of many Pennine dales and Lake District fells are the groups of cairns on the high ground. There is a fine cluster of "stone men" on The Nab of Wild Boar Fell - and a smaller group on subsidiary peak, Little Fell (559 m, 1834 ft) at grid reference NY766008, 2 km to the north. There seems little agreement on when, why, or by which people such cairns were built. (One common suggestion, that they were built by shepherds as markers for paths, may explain some of the cruder "piles of stones"; but groups like those on The Nab surely need a more convincing explanation).

Wild Boar Fell, seen from Mallerstang in June, with wild flowers in the hay meadows  
The table top profile of Wild Boar Fell, from Aisgill  
The Nab, Wild Boar Fell  
Cairns on The Nab, Wild Boar Fell  
A panoramic shot along the eastern escarpment; Ann Bowker

References

  1. ^ A. Wainwright, Wainwright in the Limestone Dales, Guild Publishing, 1991 (page 12-16)

External links

Media related to Wild Boar Fell at Wikimedia Commons

Coordinates: 54°23′03″N 2°22′27″W / 54.38411°N 2.37412°W / 54.38411; -2.37412

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