Wild Camping on Moors

Posted in The Moors on April 7th, 2015 by David Murphy

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On the 27th March 2015 I wanted somewhere local to get away and this is ideal. The views arnt spectacular but it’s Wildcamping all the same. The hardest thing about Wildcamping is parking the car and hoping some nosey git doesn’t report it, which I find quite common. Sometimes I will stick a note on the window explaining I have ran out of petrol and will be back soon.
I arrived at the spot about an hour before sundown erected the Nemo Moki and setup up my camera to capture a sunset. Fires burning In the distance a common site on moorland this time of year and the sound of grouse is pleasant on the ear, it gives that feeling of been isolated.
As darkness fell Daveswildcamping kitchen was about to spring into life this time it would be a simple but tasty Corned beef hash.
It was at this time a pleasant evening the sky was clearing and zero wind, a relaxing view of the moon with clouds blowing past it, all was good. I lay on my back with the door open looking out until the weather changed. At first I notice the breeze picking up ever so slightly then it clouded over ” no more stars”. The rain started so I zipped up my exposed door. The Moki comes with one detachable vestibule where the second is an optional extra. It also comes with exposed seams that need sealing which I have found quite a chore as my first attempt has failed to make the tent weather tight. The doors seem to be the biggest problem, ok if the vestibule is used as this keeps the wet from hitting it. There are two lower seams the higher one has the mesh sewn to it which is attached to a piece of material which is attached to the outer door. Water collects in this channel as this isn’t taped in the long troff that runs the width of the door like the seam is taped on the inside. Water runs along this channel and down inside the tent at the corners and along the front of the tent below the door. Poor design idea if you ask me, I will attempt to seam seal this area which they don’t say this even needs doing in the instructions.
I awakened to a puddle in one of the corners the side where no vestibule was attached, this is work in progress. I guess the main problem with these single skin tents is the outer wall is attached to a bath tube floor and seams need to be shit hot. The normal two skin tent water can run down the outer wall and it just soaks into the ground as the bedroom has the bathtubs Seperate from the fly so this isn’t an issue.
I didn’t have much sleep thinking about the water running in my £800 tent, oh well I just need it to blow away now and be done with it.

Watch my video below



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